2020 Teaching Artist Institute 

Virtual Professionalization, Developmentally Appropriate Teaching and Culturally Responsive Social & Emotional Learning

Teaching Artist Institute consists of five sessions to prepare teaching artists to strengthen their skills. Sessions will take place over the course of a 5 day window of time and will focus on the following areas: a) Virtual Professionalization, which will include trainings on virtual teaching and professionalism within the teaching profession b) Developmentally Appropriate Teaching, which will include trainings from Wolftrap Institute on Early Learning to support teachers in developing Pre K & K appropriate applications of their work; and c) Culturally Responsive Social & Emotional Learning (SEL), which will work with DOE representatives from HIDOE-led Nā Hopena Aʻo or HĀ initiatives, along with leaders in SEL programming. The institute will also have the foundation of core content connected to Hawaiian culture.

Location: Online via mauiartseducation.org   

Schedule

December 14-18, 2020

Dec 14, 2020

  • 10am-12pm | Jackie BurnsVirtual Teaching and Professional Identities as a Teaching Artist

Dec 15, 2020

  • 9am-11am | Ivee CruzCulturally Relevant Social & Emotional Learning with the Arts
  • 11am-12pm | Ilima LoomisTeaching with Hawaiian Culture

Dec 16, 2020

  • 9am-1pm | Wolftrap Center For Early LearningDevelopmentally Appropriate Teaching and Learning Online

Dec 17, 2020

  • 9am-11am | Kaʻanohi Kalama-MacomberCulturally Relevant Teaching and Nā Hopena Aʻo or HĀ initiatives
  • 11am-12pm | Hōkūao PellegrinoPower and Significance of Kalo

Dec 18, 2020

  • 9am-12pm | Jamie Simpson Steele, PhDDeveloping Online Professional Identities as Teaching Artists

TAI (Day 1)
TAI (Day 2)
TAI (Day 4)
TAI (Day 5)

Presenters

Jackie Burns

Associate Artistic Director, National Dance Institute

Jackie has been dancing, performing, and choreographing throughout the Albuquerque and Santa Fe areas for over 30 years. She began her training under Patricia Dickinson and Suzanne M. Johnston in Albuquerque and received her BA in psychology from the University of New Mexico. Jackie has served on the faculty for the annual Bill Evans Rhythm Tap Dance Jams and the Centrum’s Bill Evans Dance Intensive in Port Townsend, WA. She has performed and choreographed for NMBC, the Bill Evan’s Tap Ensemble, Musical Theatre Southwest, and the UNM Dance Department. Jackie has been with NDI New Mexico since 2000 and works closely with the Outreach, Residency and After School programs.

Ivee Cruz

SEL Educator, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, College of Education

Ivee Cruz is a visionary, creative, facilitator, educator, dancer and conscious spirit. Ivee is passionate about growth, transformation and change. Ms. Cruz is a global citizen, born in the Philippines, raised on the borderlands of California and Mexico, currently blessed to call Hawaiʻi home. She has lived, worked, and studied in the South Pacific, Southeast Asia, Europe, Africa, Central America and the Caribbean. Ms. Cruz is a lifelong learner and is currently a PhD candidate in Education with a focus on Curriculum and Instruction at the University of Hawaiʻi at Manoa. She has a Masters of Arts in International Educational Development from Teachers College, Columbia University and a Bachelors of Arts in Global & International Studies and Sociology from the University of California Santa Barbara. Ivee has been an educator for over 20 years in public, private, and charter schools across K-12 and higher education. She has experience in social entrepreneurship, NGOs, non-profit, and governmental sectors. Her contemplative experience includes People of Color Retreats at Deer Park Monastery, Mindful Schools – Educator Training, Greater Good Science Center, and Courage of Care. As a counselor, educator, and facilitator, she aspires to bridge culture, diversity, spirituality, equity, leadership, and consciousness for youth in education.

Ilima Loomis

Hawaii Based Freelance Writer

Ilima Loomis is a Hawaiʻi-based freelance writer with more than 18 years of experience in journalism and content marketing. With a background in writing about science and technology, she has a knack for taking a complex subject and helping readers understand not only “what’s going on” but “why should I care.” She specializes in writing about healthcare, science, and Hawaiʻi.

Wolf Trap

Institute for Early Learning Through the Arts

Wolf Trap Institute’s professional development empowers infant, toddler, preschool, and kindergarten teachers to integrate the performing arts into their classrooms. For more than 35 years, Wolf Trap has worked with early childhood educators across the country to provide the training and tools they need to use the arts to teach and inspire. “The Wolf Trap method is the golden key to engaging a child’s curiosity and imagination in a focused, fresh, and fun manner.” -Joy Jimenez, Wolf Trap Teaching Artist, San Antonio, TX

Ka’anohiokalā Kalama-Macomber

Nā Hopena Aʻo Project Manager, HIDOE

Kaʻanohiokalā Kalama-Macomber is a mother, a daughter and a kumu hula who is passionate about working with and for the lāhui in order to support the future generations of Hawaiʻi nei. From Koʻolaupoko, Oʻahu, Kaʻanohi has 10+ years of experience as a steward of Hawaiʻi culture-based educational programming. Her work with schools, families, and extended communities has helped to inform the work that she does today as the Nā Hopena Education Specialist with the HIDOE – Office of Hawaiian Education.

Hōkūao Pellegrino

Noho’ana Farm & ‘Āina Based Learning Designer

The place where Hōkūao Pellegrino was born was once one of the most prolific growing areas for kalo (taro) on Maui. In historic times, Waikapū, within the ahupua‘a (mountain-to-sea land division) of Nā Wai ‘Ehā, was green with lo‘i (taro terraces) as far as the eye could see. Today, Hōkūao and his family operate Noho‘ana, an organic wetland kalo and diversified farm, on family-owned agricultural land in Waikapū. Along with traditionally grown kalo, the family cultivates Polynesian introduced crops such as ‘ulu (breadfruit), mai‘a (banana), ‘uala (sweet potato), kukui (candlenut), kamani trees and kō (sugarcane), as well as vegetable crops and fruit orchards. Hōkūao’s work at Noho‘ana Farm is closely aligned with his career at Kamehameha Schools. A land education specialist, he manages statewide collaborations on land owned by Kamehameha Schools, leasing agriculture and conservation land, protecting cultural and natural resources, conducting agriculture and aquaculture activities, and implementing land-based education programs for students statewide.

Jamie Simpson Steele, PhD

Associate Professor, Institute for Teacher Education , University of Hawai’i Mānoa

Dr. Jamie Simpson Steele is Associate Professor at the College of Education, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa where she prepares teacher candidates to integrate the arts throughout the curriculum. As a teaching artist, she continues to explore the development of new curriculum and contribute to professional development opportunities for teaching artists and in-service teachers. Her research interests address issues of social justice, performances of culture, arts integration, and performance as research methodology. Dr. Simpson Steele collaborates with leading arts organizations such as Honolulu Theatre for Youth, Hawai‘i Arts Alliance, and Maui Arts and Culture Center to better understand and sustain the arts in schools throughout the state of Hawai‘i.

If you are interested in attending, please email Education@mauiarts.org.